Spectrum Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe in Spectrum

The Sunday Times Spectrum Magazine publishes Robin Hammond's Zimbabwe work on it's front page. 18 August 2013

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Brave Festival 2013

Robin Hammond's portrait of a gold miner in Mozambique used for the 2013 Brave Festival in Poland

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‘Your wounds will be named silence’ Exhibited in Arles

‘Your wounds will be named silence’ Exhibited at the 2013 Les Rencontres d'Arles Photo-festival, July 1st - September 22nd 2013

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Forma Invitation

‘Your wounds will be named silence’ Exhibition in Milan

Your wounds will be named silence’ Exhibition in Milan, Forma Gallery. 25 April – 24 Mai 2013

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'Your wounds will be named silence' on the National Geographic Website

National Geographic Website

Zimbabwe work appears on National Geographic website

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FotoEvidence

CONDEMNED wins FotoEvidence Book Award

The 2013 FotoEvidence Book Award brought projects from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas documenting assaults on human dignity from around the world. There is no shortage of people living under conditions of great injustice but the work submitted for the 2013 FotoEvidence Book Award shows that dedicated photographers everywhere are working to bring this to light and inspire change. We are proud to publish and disseminate the selected projects, which we feel demonstrate the courage and commitment of documentary photographers in pursuit of social justice. Continue Reading →

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Your wounds will be named silence

Zimbabweans living on the front lines of a dictators brutal campaign to hold on to power

Zimbabwe has become a forgotten land.

Today, with no light cast on the dark shadows of President Robert Mugabe’s relentless tyranny, the downtrodden people of one of Africa’s most hauntingly beautiful nations feel rightfully abandoned by the world.

Their modest hope devoured by the malice and greed of politicians, Zimbabwe’s people have nowhere to turn and, against the brutality of the police and military, no strength to cry out in the dark.

Your Wounds Will Be Named Silence tells the story of a lost generation of African’s, living in fear and dying of disease, poverty and neglect. 

A photo essay funded by the Carmignac Foundation Photojournalism Award.

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ZIMBABWE – Your Wounds Will Be Named Silence, the book, OUT NOW

Robin Hammond's photo project on Zimbabwe is published by Actes Sud and Foundation Carmignac Gestion

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CONDEMNED – Mental Health in African Countries in Crisis

Where there is war, famine, displacement, it is the most vulnerable that suffer the greatest.

Abandoned by governments, forgotten by the aid community, neglected and abused by entire societies. Africans with mental illness in regions in crisis are resigned to the dark corners of churches, chained to rusted hospital beds, locked away to live behind the bars of filthy prisons.

Some have suffered trauma leading to illness. Others were born with mental disability. In countries where infrastructure has collapsed and mental health professionals have fled, treatment is often the same – a life in chains.

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Famine in The Horn of Africa

the worst drought in 60 years impacts the war torn city of Mogadishu and the world's largest refugee camp - Dadaab

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In The Shadow Of Armageddon

The border between South Korea and the Communist north is one of the most volatile regions on Earth.

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DRC, Rape: a multi-media production by Panos Pictures

According to several UN reports, the unregulated exploitation of minerals, used in the manufacture of devices such as phones and computers, has fed a conflict which has raged since 1996. It has directly or indirectly caused the deaths of as many as 6.9 million people, and seen the rape, mostly by armed men, of more than 500,000 women .

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AIMediaAwards2010

Amnesty International Media Award 2010

Two winning stories in two separate categories for 'Zimbabwe’s Bloody Diamonds' & 'Toxic Jeans'

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Rape – A Weapon of War

Under the cover of war in The Democratic Republic of Congo rape is being committed on a massive scale

In the Democratic Republic of Congo as many as 500,000 women and children have been raped in acts of war. Sexual violence has become so widespread that the UN’s Margot Wallstrom, described Congo as the ‘rape capital of the world’. Medicin San Frontiers (Doctors without borders) says that over half of all the rape cases it deals with worldwide are in DRC.

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Oil rich, dirt poor

Angola’s poor await the trickle down from the country's vast oil revenues

Angola continues to have one of the fastest growing economies on the planet.

After four decades of conflict, Angola was a basket case. 1.5m were killed and more than 4m forced to flee their homes. A whole generation missed their education. Infrastructure, political institutions and social services had to be rebuilt, often from scratch.

The pace of development since peace returned has been staggering. Roads, ports, railways, hotels, shopping centres, hospitals, universities—even whole new towns—are rising up out of the bush. The capital, Luanda, has changed out of all recognition.
None of this would be possible without Angola’s vast oil reserves, estimated at 13 billion barrels. Today, the country pumps 1.9m barrels a day, making Angola sub-Saharan Africa’s biggest producer after Nigeria – it is poised to be number one. Oil accounts for more than half of the country’s GDP, 80% of the government’s revenues and 90% of export earnings. Angola has overtaken Saudi Arabia and Iran to become China’s biggest supplier of oil.

All this though has yet to improve ordinary Angolan lives very much.

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The dark side of denim

Suppliers to Gap and Levis poison the heart of one of Africa’s poorest countries

Solid waste from garment factories supplying Gap and Levis is being dumped and burned, untreated liquid waste – dark blue dye – is being poured into the Caledon River – polluting drinking water and killing river life.

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AIMediaAwards2009

Amnesty International Media Award 2009

Winner of the Periodicals-Newspaper Supplements category for 'Why do the Italians Hate Us?'

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