High tide wins AICA Prize: Communicating the Koyoto Protocol

With photography by Robin Hammond of Panos Pictures, this multimedia piece looks at the island nation of Tuvalu, as the Tuvaluan people become some of the first environmental refugees, a direct result of man-made climate change.

Continue Reading →

Tuvalu01Tuvalu02Tuvalu03Tuvalu04Tuvalu05Tuvalu06Tuvalu07Tuvalu08Tuvalu10Tuvalu12Tuvalu14Tuvalu15Tuvalu17Tuvalu18Tuvalu19Tuvalu20Tuvalu21Tuvalu22Tuvalu23Tuvalu24

High tide

Tuvalu is sinking fast, its residents lives determined by the rising tide

The fourth smallest country in the world after Vatican City, Monaco and Nauru, and one of the least populated, Tuvalu, a tiny Island halfway between Hawaii and New Zealand, is drowning and fast. Today its 13,000 residents are the most environmentally aware people on earth; their daily lives determined by the tides and the greasy salt water that gathers around their feet every day.

Due to rising sea-waters caused by climate change, in the next decade Tuvalu could be a distant memory on an out-dated world map.

Read More...
TurkanaDrought01TurkanaDrought02TurkanaDrought08TurkanaDrought10TurkanaDrought11TurkanaDrought12

Climate Canaries

The first victims of climate change? The nomadic pastoralists of northern Kenya

In conference rooms and in academic papers, the experts call it ‘pervasive pre-famine conditions’. In the village, squatting on his brick-sized wooden stool in the red dirt of east Africa, Lokuwam Lokitalauk calls it a death sentence. His curses ricochet round the quiet village and his glaucoma-misted eyes dart off, surveying the stick-like spectres of children drifting listlessly about.

Read More...